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Golden Hour Shawl: Pattern Review and FO

January 17, 2019

Do you ever crave certain types of knitting? Do some seasons make you turn towards socks, or big bright colors? This past fall I was desperately craving something worsted. Without realizing it, I’ve tended towards fingering weight (I mean, more yardage for the money…). But sometimes you just need something cozy. That was how I felt when I knit the Golden Hour Shawl.

Even though it was the middle of August, I was ready for Fall. I was tired of the heat; tired of the bugs. Everyone was gearing up to go back to school, and here I was with the same old schedule. I was tired and feeling uninspired with all my current projects. Somehow, I felt drawn to the Golden Hour Shawl. The chunky weight, bobbles, and colorwork seemed comfortable. Rustic, even.  Autumnal. Turns out, it was just what I needed.

The Pattern


The Golden Hour Shawl is an Andrea Mowry pattern that features baubles, lace, and color play. It calls for 3 colors of a worsted weight yarn. The pattern, quite simply, is a joy to knit. I can’t remember the last time I’ve enjoyed a pattern so much. Even the colorwork sections were way easier than they looked. They utilize a slip stitch pattern so you’re only ever working with one strand of yarn. I love that this shawl is worsted weight too. It gives it such a homey feel, and I don’t find the finished product heavy at all.

The most challenging aspect of the Golden Hour Shawl was making sure that I kept my floats loose during the two-color sections. I tend to pull too tight, which can cause the fabric to pucker, or pop one color too far forward. I had to remind myself to slow down, relax, and carry the yarn gently to keep the floats night and loose.

 The Yarn

I used Berroco Vintage in Slate, Gingham, and Pumpkin for my version of the Golden Hour Shawl. Since I was a bit more adventurous with color than usual (Orange? Me?), I was a little wary of throwing down a huge chunk of change. What if I didn’t like the finished colors all together. I shouldn’t have worried. The colors look great together in the finished shawl.

I love how the shawl feels too. Vintage might not get a lot of respect as a “budget” yarn, but I think it’s a solid yarn! I was happy with the colors, happy with the finished fabric, and happy with the quality. The price was just icing on the cake!

I would love to make this shawl again in other colors. Maybe some earthy greens? Throw in a nice mustard yellow? It would look great done all in neutrals! If you’re looking for an engaging comfort knit, the Golden Hour Shawl is the way to go!

What do you like to knit when you’re feeling uninspired? What speaks to you?

Sewing

Gypsum Skirt

August 26, 2018
Gypsum Header

I’m going to throw a curve ball here. You guys ready? The next FO that I have to share is actually sewn and not knitted! If you’re saying to yourself, “I didn’t know she could sew,” you’d probably be right. My knowledge is tenuous at best, but that’s okay, because the Gypsum Skirt pattern is really easy. Like, no zippers, no buttons. It’s just about my speed. 

Gypsum Skirt

The Pattern

The Gypsum Skirt is a pattern by Sew Liberated that is modeled to be a skirt version of their Arenite Pants. It features an elastic waist, flat felled seams, and huge ass side pockets. The pockets are really what make it. Also, if you need experience with french seams, the pockets offer an excellent opportunity to get comfortable with the process. If you’re a little nervous about the pockets, or just want a slightly different look, view B offers a more traditional side pocket option. 

Gypsum Skirt

The pattern is intended for woven fabrics. Sew Liberated recommends a drapey fabric for View A like rayon challis, tencel twill,  or silk noil. But, I’m cheap and my local Joann’s is tragic so I made mine out of a shirting fabric. It still came out great. Like I mentioned before, the elasticized waist makes for easy finishing. This is great, because if it required a zipper or something, it would still be sitting unfinished by my couch. 

Gypsum Skirt

The Skirt

So if you haven’t already gathered, I made View A…you know, for the pockets. I cut a size 6 (for reference, my waist is 27″ and my hips are 36″). I am happy with the size that I chose and would use the same size if I made it again. The construction of the skirt is really clever, with the french seamed pockets and the flat felled side panel seams. I did accidentally cut my back piece wrong and ended up having to seam the center back, but I don’t think it affected the end result. 

Gypsum Skirt

The trickiest part for me was inserting the elastic and getting the waistband all sewed down. I may have fudged that part a bit. In the end though, I’m really happy with the finished piece and anticipate making it again in the future. And the best part? It’s SUPER comfortable. And it has pockets. 

Finished Object Knitting Lifestyle

Tegna Sweater : Pattern Review

July 13, 2017

Summer knitting is coming along nicely. How is everyone else doing with their projects? The first of two summer Knitalongs that I decided to participate in was the Tegna Sweater KAL with Caitlin Hunter (@boylandknitworks). KAL #2(The Summer of Lace KAL with Brooklyn Tweed) is currently kicking my butt, so we’re not going to talk about it…

Tegna Sweater

The Pattern

Tegna is a short, slightly dolman sleeved, cropped sweater with a lacy hem. The pattern itself is delightfully easy and totally manageable for a short summer knit. It’s knit up in a fingering weight yarn, which creates a very versatile weight. I often find that the worsted and bulky weight sweaters that fly off my needles never get work in the Texas heat. Fingers crossed that this fingering weight sweater can get a little bit more use!

Tegna Sweater

The focal feature of Tegna is the lace section along the hem. While is looks really difficult, I didn’t have a ton of trouble with it. You definitely have to keep track on your lace chart, because there’s not a lot of repeat from row to row. That being said, it’s pretty easy to read where the pattern is going. After the lace, the rest is  nothing but relaxing stockinette. For the neck hem, you have the option of binding off and picking up stitches, or placing neck stitches on a holder. I bound them off, but next time I think i would use a holder.

Tegna is really flexible when it comes to gauge. I used size 5 needles for most of it, but needle sizes can vary widely. I also made my Tegna pretty fitted, while other have done a more loose and drapey version. I love that the pattern can be so versatile and still look great! I would totally try knitting this again in a drapey linen or silk blend.

Tegna Sweater

The Yarn

I knit Tegna using 4 skeins of Quince and Co. Finch in the color Honey. I expected to use more than 4 skeins, so I preemptively ordered more, but I didn’t end up using them. Finch is a 100% wool fingering weight yarn. It is very consistent in texture and has great stitch definition. Some users have complained about pilling, but I haven’t noticed any issues so far. It did bleed a little bit of color in the wash, but otherwise I’ve had no issues with it. It’s an easy to knit with yarn and I enjoy the color palette.

The only issue I have with Quince and Co. is that their online stock doesn’t always update very quickly. If they run out of a color, it can be quite some time until they restock, which is why I was so skittish about running out of yarn. Despite this, I would use the yarn again, and would love to try out some different colors. I am in love with this honey color though…

Tegna Sweater

I’m hoping I get a lot of wear out of this Tegna sweater. I was fun to watch everyone knit it on instagram and the same time and it’s even more fun to see how everyone is styling their completed project! Did you participate in the Tegna KAL? I’d love to see your finished product! Thinking about making a Tegna for yourself? I’d love to hear what yarn you’re using!